Turbot

A great combination to get the benefits of olive oil as part of your diet for heart health

Updated July 15th 2022

Extra-virgin olive oil is a heart-healthy oil that has many health benefits. One benefit is that it can help to lower cholesterol levels. Turbot is a fish that is high in omega-3 fatty acids, which are beneficial for heart health. When used together, extra-virgin olive oil and turbot can be a great way to improve heart health. The omega-3 fatty acids in the fish help to protect against heart disease, while the olive oil helps to lower cholesterol levels. This combination can be a great way to improve heart health and reduce the risk of heart disease.

Adding leeks and vegetables makes this fish dish stand out and great to cook and of course eat. Turbot is famous for its delicate flavour and cooked with our extra virgin olive oil will make a memorable meal.

0/5 (0 Reviews)

For the turbot and seaweed butter:

  • 2 6oz turbot fillets skin on & quite thick
  • 2 tbsp seaweed flakes
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 25g butter
  • Juice of half a lemon

For the parsley extra virgin olive oil:

  • 250ml of extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 small bunch parsley
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • Zest and juice ½ lemon

For the leeks:

  • Half a leek, finely sliced
  • 25g butter
  • Salt and pepper

For the mussels and sea vegetables:

  • 100ml dry white wine
  • Pinch of salt and pepper
  • Handful of spinach
  • 2 pieces of chard
  • 50g samphire grass
  • 10-12 kalettes
  • 100g fresh Cornish mussels

Instructions

  1. First job is to get the parsley, garlic, lemon, extra virgin olive oil ready, which can be done the day before. Bring a pan of water to the boil, place the parsley in the boiling water for 30 seconds, refresh in iced water and squeeze to get all the water out. In a blender add the olive oil, the squeezed parsley, zest and half the juice of the lemon, a good pinch of salt and the garlic. Blend for 1 minute, add more olive oil if required. Drain through muslin laid into a sieve into a clean bowl and leave for several hours to drop through, to leave you with a bright green dressing.
  2. To cook the turbot: place a pan over a medium heat, add a little extra virgin olive oil, a good knob of butter and the seaweed. When the butter is melted add the turbot. Fry gently, skin side down for 2 minutes, then turn, baste and pop in to a pre-heated 200ºC oven for 8-10 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, gently sweat the leeks in a little butter for 5-6 minutes without colour. Add a good pinch of salt and pepper. After 8-10 mins take the turbot out of the oven and baste again. Cover with a piece of foil and allow to rest for 5-8 minutes.
  4. Next, for the mussels and sea vegetables: put a saucepan on a high heat, add the wine, the mussels, the kalettes, sliced chard and bring to a boil. Next add the spinach and samphire grass. Add a pinch of salt. The mussels should have opened, if not discard. Remove from heat, drain and keep warm to begin to plate. Remove the foil from the turbot, peel off the turbot skin and baste again in the seaweed butter and the last half of the lemon juice
  5. On a very warm pair of plates or bowls, place the flavoured lemon, parsley olive oil in the centre, a good amount. Then place the sautéed leeks in the centre, then build on that with the steamed kalettes, spinach, samphire grass and place the turbot on top. Arrange the steamed mussels around the plate. Add a pinch of sea salt crushed over the turbot and the dish is done.

Breet, Britt, Butt, Turbot, Brat, European turbot and True turbot are the common names used to refer the species of flatfish within the family Scophthalmidae. The term was derived from Old French tourbout which is a derivative of Latin word turbo.

They are usually found in muddy and sandy seabeds. It is also regarded as a left sided flatfish which have both eyes on the left side of head. The body and head are mottled with various tubercles or bony knobs. The body is asymmetrical disk shaped or circular measuring about 100 cm (39 inches) long and 25 kg (55 lb) in weight. The color of the skin ranges from gray brown, light brown which is marked with dark color. It has bright white flesh and scaleless skin.

When cooked, it provides subtle or refined flavour with delicate and mild taste.

An Ideal Heart Healthy Companion To Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Turbot is loaded with Vitamin B3, protein and Vitamin B12. It is also loaded with minerals such as magnesium, selenium and phosphorus which assist in the functions of immune system, maintenance of strong teeth, bones and supports metabolism.

Diet For Heart Health

In the Arctic, people have low chances of suffering from heart ailments as seafood has low content of saturated fat and high content of omega-3. It prevents the heart health from various diseases and lowers the cholesterol in blood.

Turbot with Extra Virgin Olive Oil is not only a heart-healthy dish, but one that is full of flavour and easy to prepare. Turbot, also known as brill, is a white fish with a delicate flavour that pairs well with the grassy notes of extra virgin olive oil. This heart-healthy dish is simple to make and can be on the table in under 30 minutes. The result is a flaky, moist fish that is full of flavor. When paired with a simple salad or roasted vegetables, this dish makes a heart-healthy and delicious meal.

Latest Recipes